Is it the food that's making her sick?

Get a copy of this shocking free report. 

We respect your email privacy

Causes and Treatments for a Dog’s Weak Bladder

Does Your Dog Have a Weak Bladder?

There are several causes and treatments for a dog’s weak bladder. Does your dog appear to have a weak bladder?

First you and your vet should make sure the problem really is a weak bladder. A weak bladder in dogs can often be misdiagnosed as such when the problem is the dog is actually marking their territory. The problem can be also due to behavior problems, and it is more common in female dogs. How can we tell the difference if you are the owner of a dog with this problem?

Causes and Treatments for a Dog’s Weak Bladder

Causes

1)  Your beloved pet is consuming more water than is normal. This often leads to a weak bladder and the need to urinate often. This is often a sign the dog may have medical issues such as diabetes, kidney failure, or hyperthyroidism.

2)  If the dog has had recent urinary tract infections, this can cause the bladder to weaken. This may be a temporary problem once the infection is cured, especially in younger dogs.

3)  In female dogs a decrease in hormones such as estrogen can result in a weak bladder sphincter causing the dog to urinate more than normal.

4)  If your dog has suffered an injury or been diagnosed with a disease to the spinal cord this is possibly the cause. Also any injury to the lumbar area is another possible cause for the incontinence.

Treatments

1)  If you suspect your dog might be suffering from one of these problems, there is a relatively easy procedure your local vet can perform as a way to pin down what the cause is. Have your vet do a urinalysis or urine culture at their office. In most cases this will be all that is needed to diagnose the problem properly. If this does not yield the results for correcting the problem, the vet can then do a radiograph and blood panel test to further narrow down the issue of why your dog in fact has a weak bladder.

2)  The normal treatment for a dog with a urinary infection and or bladder infection is through the use of antibiotics. Your vet can also perform surgery to correct a weak bladder sphincter but this does have possible risks and side effects, so they might start the dog on hormonal therapy before using surgery as a last resort.

3)  There are several drugs that can be given if there is no specific cause found. According to an article on the Medi-Vet.com website:

When no specific cause can be identified for the incontinence drugs may be given that increase the tone of the muscles that hold urine in the bladder. Some drugs that are used for this purpose include estrogen, ephedrine and phenylpropanolamine.

4)  If all else fails, you will want to consider using dog diapers. These are made to fit all size dogs comfortably and will need to be changed once a day.

Above are some of the causes and treatments for a dog’s weak bladder. There are others, and you will probably need a veterinarian to sort it out if it becomes a continuing problem.

Have you had a dog with a weak bladder? If so, share below how you dealt with it.

7 Responses to Causes and Treatments for a Dog’s Weak Bladder
  1. Helen
    February 23, 2014 | 6:48 am

    The link to the Medi-vet article doesn’t work. All the medical options seem to be for bitches, what do we do with dogs?

  2. Monet Causion
    February 20, 2014 | 7:22 am

    I have a 6 month old female yorkie that seems to squat and pee out of nervousness and or excitement. She only does this when I am letting her out of the cage or reaching to pet or touch her. I’ve had this issue before with dachshunds. How can I help this problem? I didn’t see a example of how to help this situation. I’ve tried opening her cage unexpectedly and that sometimes work. I also constantly take her outside for bathroom breaks. Please help!

  3. Angela
    January 15, 2014 | 2:31 pm

    Hello,

    We recently adopted a two year old male Weimaraner who had been rescued from a high kill shelter. He was horrifyingly emaciated. The rescuers had him fixed and he’s been a been such a project to adapt into the family: clingy, afraid of going out for pees in the dark, excessive pawing, and neurotic about being fed at a certain time during the day.

    I give him a bowl of water immediately after he has eaten and let him out regularly during the day. Sometimes, though, I may have to let him about within minutes of going. Today, rather than asking/ barking to go out he just wandered around the kitchen peeing.

    Has his starvation affected his bladder or could there be complications of getting him fixed?

    I am neurotically house proud and am conscious of my house starting to smell of urine. Jasper has done this several times now and I feel like I’m constantly cleaning up after him.

    Any input would help considerably.

  4. dominatrix training
    January 2, 2014 | 9:35 am

    Why people still make use of to read news papers when in this
    technological world everything is existing on web?

  5. live femdom cams
    December 1, 2013 | 10:17 am

    Thank you a lot for sharing this with all of us you really recognize what you’re speaking approximately!
    Bookmarked. Kindly also seek advice from my web site =).

    We can have a hyperlink alternate arrangement between us

  6. Robert Wood
    November 4, 2013 | 8:58 am

    I have rescued a dog and have her indoors we take her out every hour to go potty she will pee every time I go and put her leash on to take her out what can I do to stop this its driving me nuts we live in Wyoming Its cold so I would not leave her out side can some one please help

  7. what is emo
    October 31, 2013 | 1:21 pm

    wonderful points altogether, you just received a new reader.
    What would you suggest about your publish that you simply made a few days
    ago? Any positive?

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

×

Join the Dogington Post Mailing List. Get up-to-the-minute recall alerts plus tips, tricks and special deals! Click here.